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Aspirin

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What Is Aspirin?

Aspirin, also known by its generic name acetylsalicylic acid, is a common over-the-counter medication that belongs to the class of drugs called salicylates. It is widely used for its analgesic (pain-relieving), antipyretic (fever-reducing), and anti-inflammatory properties. Aspirin is primarily used to alleviate mild to moderate pain, reduce fever, and relieve inflammation associated with conditions such as arthritis. It is also commonly used as a blood-thinning agent to help prevent the formation of blood clots that can lead to heart attacks and strokes. However, it's important to note that aspirin is not suitable for everyone and may have side effects and drug interactions. It can cause gastrointestinal irritation and increase the risk of bleeding. Individuals with certain medical conditions, such as asthma or stomach ulcers, should consult with a healthcare professional before taking aspirin. Aspirin is available in various forms, including tablets, chewable tablets, and effervescent powders. It is also commonly found in combination with other medications, such as in cold and flu remedies or as part of a daily low-dose regimen for specific cardiovascular conditions. Always follow the instructions on the packaging or as provided by a healthcare professional when using aspirin. It is important to use it responsibly and avoid exceeding the recommended dosage. If you have any concerns or questions, it is advisable to consult with a healthcare professional.

How to use Aspirin?

Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid, is a medication that belongs to the class of drugs called salicylates. It is commonly used to relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and lower fever. Aspirin is available in various forms, including tablets, chewable tablets, and suppositories. To use aspirin properly, it's important to follow the instructions provided by your healthcare provider or indicated on the packaging. Here are some general guidelines: 1. Read the label: Carefully read the instructions, warnings, and dosage information on the packaging. If you have any questions or concerns, consult your healthcare provider or pharmacist. 2. Dosage: Take the recommended dose as prescribed by your doctor. The dosage may vary depending on your specific condition, age, and weight. Never exceed the recommended dose without medical advice. 3. Administration: Swallow the aspirin tablet whole with a full glass of water unless otherwise instructed. Avoid breaking, crushing, or chewing the tablet unless it is a chewable form. If using a suppository, follow the instructions provided on how to insert it safely. 4. Timing: Take aspirin as directed by your healthcare provider or as needed for pain or fever relief. Follow the recommended dosing schedule and do not take it more frequently than recommended. 5. Food and beverages: Aspirin can be taken with or without food. However, taking it with food or milk can help reduce stomach discomfort. Avoid drinking alcohol while taking aspirin, as it can increase the risk of stomach irritation or bleeding. 6. Adverse effects: Like any medication, aspirin may cause side effects. Common side effects include stomach upset, heartburn, and drowsiness. If you experience severe or persistent side effects, contact your healthcare provider. 7. Precautions: Aspirin should not be used by individuals who have certain medical conditions, such as bleeding disorders, stomach ulcers, or asthma. It is also important to inform your healthcare provider about any other medications or supplements you are taking, as they can interact with aspirin. Remember, this is a general overview of how to use aspirin. Always consult your healthcare provider or pharmacist for personalized advice and to ensure it is appropriate for your specific situation.

Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid, is a medication that belongs to the class of drugs called salicylates. It is commonly used as a pain reliever, fever reducer, and anti-inflammatory agent. Here are some important warnings associated with the use of aspirin: 1. Allergy and hypersensitivity: Individuals who are allergic to aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may experience allergic reactions such as hives, swelling, difficulty breathing, or rash. It is crucial to avoid aspirin if you have a known allergy to it. 2. Gastrointestinal effects: Aspirin can irritate the stomach lining and increase the risk of gastrointestinal side effects, including stomach ulcers, bleeding, and perforation. It is recommended to take aspirin with food or milk to minimize stomach upset. If you have a history of stomach ulcers or gastrointestinal bleeding, you should use aspirin with caution or avoid it altogether. 3. Bleeding risk: Aspirin is a blood-thinning agent that reduces the ability of blood to clot. While this can be beneficial for individuals at risk of heart attacks or stroke, it also increases the risk of bleeding, particularly in individuals with a bleeding disorder, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, or those taking other blood-thinning medications. 4. Reye's syndrome: Aspirin should never be given to children or teenagers who have a viral infection, such as chickenpox or flu-like symptoms, due to the risk of developing Reye's syndrome. This is a rare but potentially fatal condition that affects the liver and brain. 5. Interactions with other medications: Aspirin can interact with various medications, including anticoagulants (blood thinners), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). These interactions can increase the risk of bleeding or other adverse effects. It is important to inform your healthcare provider about all the medications you are taking to avoid potential interactions. Always consult with your healthcare provider or pharmacist for more specific information about the warnings associated with the use of aspirin, as individual circumstances may vary.

Before taking aspirin, there are several important warnings and precautions to keep in mind: 1. Allergy or sensitivity: If you have a known allergy or sensitivity to aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen or naproxen, you should avoid taking aspirin. 2. Bleeding risk: Aspirin can increase the risk of bleeding, especially in individuals with a history of ulcers, gastrointestinal bleeding, or bleeding disorders. It is crucial to inform your doctor if you have any of these conditions or if you are taking other medications that may increase bleeding risk, such as blood thinners. 3. Children and teenagers: Aspirin should not be given to children and teenagers, particularly if they have flu-like symptoms or are recovering from a viral infection due to the potential risk of Reye's syndrome, a rare but serious condition that affects the liver and brain. 4. Pregnancy and breastfeeding: Aspirin is generally not recommended during pregnancy, especially in the third trimester, as it may increase the risk of bleeding for both the mother and the fetus. It is also advised to avoid aspirin while breastfeeding, as it can pass into breast milk. 5. Medical conditions: If you have certain medical conditions, such as asthma, stomach ulcers, kidney or liver disease, or a history of heart disease, it is important to consult with your healthcare provider before taking aspirin, as it may interact with these conditions or certain medications. 6. Side effects: Aspirin can cause side effects such as stomach upset, heartburn, and gastrointestinal bleeding. It is essential to report any unusual symptoms to your doctor promptly. Always follow your doctor's dosage instructions and read the medication label carefully for specific warnings and precautions. If you have any concerns or questions, it's best to consult your healthcare provider for personalized advice.

Aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid, is a medication that belongs to the salicylates class. It is widely used for its pain-relieving, anti-inflammatory, and blood-thinning properties. As with any medication, aspirin can potentially cause side effects. Here are some commonly reported side effects: 1. Gastrointestinal Effects: Aspirin can irritate the lining of the stomach, leading to discomfort, heartburn, and even gastrointestinal bleeding or ulcers in some cases. Taking aspirin with food or a glass of milk can reduce the risk of these symptoms. 2. Allergic Reactions: Some individuals may be allergic to aspirin or experience hypersensitivity reactions such as hives, rash, itching, or swelling, particularly in those with a history of asthma or nasal polyps. 3. Bleeding: Aspirin can inhibit platelet function and prolong bleeding time. This can pose a risk during surgeries or in individuals with bleeding disorders. It is important to inform healthcare professionals about aspirin usage before any surgical procedures. 4. Reye's Syndrome: Aspirin should not be used in children or teenagers with viral infections due to the risk of Reye's syndrome, a rare but serious condition that affects the liver and brain. 5. Tinnitus: Prolonged or high-dose usage of aspirin may cause ringing in the ears (tinnitus). It is essential to consult with a healthcare professional before starting or altering the dosage of aspirin to reduce the risk of potential side effects, especially in individuals with certain medical conditions or those taking other medications, as drug interactions may occur.

The active ingredient in Aspirin is acetylsalicylic acid, which is a type of salicylate. Salicylates are compounds derived from salicylic acid, which is found naturally in plants like willow bark. In addition to acetylsalicylic acid, Aspirin tablets may contain inactive ingredients such as corn starch, hypromellose, microcrystalline cellulose, povidone, and triacetin. These inactive ingredients are used to help bind the tablet together, improve its stability, and aid in its dissolution in the body. It's important to note that different brands or formulations of aspirin may have slightly different inactive ingredients. Aspirin is widely used as a pain reliever, fever reducer, and anti-inflammatory medication. It works by inhibiting the production of certain chemicals in the body, known as prostaglandins, which play a role in pain, inflammation, and fever. Aspirin is available both as a prescription medication and over-the-counter in various strengths and formulations. It is important to follow the recommended dosage and to consult with a healthcare professional before using aspirin, especially if you have any pre-existing medical conditions or are taking other medications.

Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid, is a commonly used medication that belongs to the class of drugs called salicylates. It is available as both a prescription drug and an over-the-counter medication. One generic version is Aspir-Low, produced by RUGBY LABORATORIES. In terms of storage, it is recommended to store aspirin at room temperature, away from excessive heat, moisture, and light. It is important to keep the medication in its original container with a tightly closed lid to ensure its potency and to prevent any outside contaminants from affecting its quality. Avoid storing aspirin in the bathroom medicine cabinet or near the kitchen sink, as heat and humidity in these areas can potentially degrade the medication. Instead, find a cool, dry place in your home that is out of reach of children and pets. If you have any specific storage instructions or concerns regarding your aspirin medication, it is advisable to consult the medication's packaging or speak with your healthcare provider or pharmacist for further guidance.